Humanity Circle

Humanity Circle

Humanity circle is formed to support vulnerable families. We aim to provide practical and emotional support to help them achieve their full potential removing any barriers for their personal development, so that they can be become viable members of their local communities and contribute to forming a stronger society that they live in.

To be a vulnerable adult it is not required to be a person with special needs; they may be vulnerable because of their circumstances. This may include poverty, family issues, mental issues and other stress. We aim to remove these barriers by either providing them mentoring support.

Under this Circle, we designed two main projects;
  1. Mental Health & Well-being
  2. Phyiscal Health & Well-being

Mental Health & Well-being

Mental health is a level of psychological well-being or an absence of mental illness. It is the "psychological state of someone who is functioning at a satisfactory level of emotional and behavioural adjustment". From the perspective of positive psychology or holism, mental health may include an individual's ability to enjoy life, and create a balance between life activities and efforts to achieve psychological resilience. According to the World Health Organization, mental health includes "subjective well-being, perceived self- efficacy, autonomy, competence, inter-generational dependence, and self- actualization of one's intellectual and emotional potential, among others." The WHO further states that the well-being of an individual is encompassed in the realization of their abilities, coping with normal stresses of life, productive work and contribution to their community. Cultural differences, subjective assessments, and competing professional theories all affect how "mental health" is defined.

Types of mental health problems

1Anger

We all feel angry at times – it's part of being human. Anger is a normal, healthy emotion, which we might experience if we feel:

  • attacked
  • deceived
  • frustrated
  • invalidated or unfairly treated
2Anxiety and panic attacks

Anxiety is what we feel when we are worried, tense or afraid – particularly about things that are about to happen, or which we think could happen in the future. Anxiety is a natural human response when we perceive that we are under threat. It can be experienced through our thoughts, feelings and physical sensations.

3Bipolar Disorder

Bipolar disorder is a mental health problem that mainly affects your mood. If you have bipolar disorder, you are likely to have times where you experience:

  • manic or hypomanic episodes (feeling high)
  • depressive episodes (feeling low)
  • potentially some psychotic symptoms during manic or depressed episodes
4Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD)

Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is an anxiety disorder related to body image.
You might be given a diagnosis of BDD if you:

  • experience obsessive worries about one or more perceived flaws in your physical appearance; the flaw cannot be seen by others or appears very slight
  • develop compulsive behaviours and routines, such as excessive use of mirrors or picking your skin, to deal with the worries you have about the way you look
5Borderline personality disorder (BPD)

Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a type of personality disorder. You might be diagnosed with a personality disorder if you have difficulties with how you think and feel about yourself and other people, and are having problems in your life as a result.

6Depression

Depression is a low mood that lasts for a long time, and affects your everyday life.

In its mildest form, depression can mean just being in low spirits. It doesn’t stop you leading your normal life but makes everything harder to do and seem less worthwhile. At its most severe, depression can be life-threatening because it can make you feel suicidal or simply give up the will to live.

7Dissociative disorders

Dissociation is one way the mind copes with too much stress, such as during a traumatic event. The word dissociation can be used in different ways but it usually describes an experience where you feel disconnected in some way from the world around you or from yourself.

If you dissociate for a long time, especially when you are young, you may develop a dissociative disorder. Instead of dissociation being something you experience for a short time it becomes a far more common experience and often the main way you deal with stressful experiences.

8Drugs - recreational drugs & alcohol

Recreational drugs are substances people may take:

  • to give themselves a pleasurable experience
  • to help them feel better if they are having a bad time
  • because their friends are using them
  • to see what it feels like.
9Eating problems

An eating problem is any relationship with food that you find difficult.

Food plays an important part in our lives and most of us will spend time thinking about what we eat. Sometimes we may try to eat more healthily, have cravings, eat more than usual or lose our appetite. Changing your eating habits every now and again is normal.

But if food and eating feels like it's taking over your life then it may become a problem.

10Hearing voices

We might say someone is ‘hearing voices’ if you hear a voice when no-one is present with you, or which other people with you cannot hear.

People have many different experiences of hearing voices. Some people don't mind their voices or simply find them irritating or distracting, while others find them frightening or intrusive.

It's common to think that if you hear voices you must have a mental health problem.

11Hypomania and mania

Hypomania and mania are periods of over-active and excited behaviour that have a significant impact on your day-to-day life.

  • Hypomania is a milder version of mania that lasts for a short period (a few days)
  • Mania is a more severe form that lasts for a longer period (a week or more)
12Loneliness

Feeling lonely isn't in itself a mental health problem, but the two are strongly linked. Having a mental health problem increases your chance of feeling lonely, and feeling lonely can have a negative impact on your mental health.

13Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD)

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is an anxiety disorder. It has two main parts: obsessions and compulsions.

  • Obsessions are unwelcome thoughts, images, urges, worries or doubts that repeatedly appear in your mind. They can make you feel very anxious (although some people describe it as 'mental discomfort' rather than anxiety).
  • Compulsions are repetitive activities that you do to reduce the anxiety caused by the obsession. It could be something like repeatedly checking a door is locked, repeating a specific phrase in your head or checking how your body feels.
14Stress

We all know what it's like to feel stressed, but it's not easy to pin down exactly what stress means. When we say things like "this is stressful" or "I'm stressed", we might be talking about:

  • Situations or events that put pressure on us – for example, times where we have lots to do and think about, or don't have much control over what happens.
  • Our reaction to being placed under pressure – the feelings we get when we have demands placed on us that we find difficult to cope with.
15Paranoia

Paranoia is thinking and feeling as if you are under threat even though there is no (or very little) evidence that you are. Paranoid thoughts can also be described as delusions. There are lots of different kinds of threat you might be scared and worried about.

Paranoid thoughts could also be exaggerated suspicions. For example, someone made a nasty comment about you once, and you believe that they are directing a hate campaign against you.

16Personality Disorders

Personality disorders are a type of mental health problem where your attitudes, beliefs and behaviours cause you longstanding problems in your life.

The word ‘personality’ refers to the pattern of thoughts, feelings and behaviour that makes each of us the individuals that we are. We don't always think, feel and behave in exactly the same way – it depends on the situation we are in, the people with us and many other things.

17Phobias

A phobia is a type of anxiety disorder. It is an extreme form of fear or anxiety triggered by a particular situation (such as going outside) or object (such as spiders), even when there is no danger.

For example, you may know that it is safe to be out on a balcony in a high-rise block, but feel terrified to go out on it or even enjoy the view from behind the windows inside the building. Likewise, you may know that a spider isn’t poisonous or that it won’t bite you, but this still doesn’t reduce your anxiety.

18Postnatal depression & perinatal mental health

Having a baby is a big life event, and it's natural to experience a range of emotions and reactions during and after your pregnancy. But if they start to have a big impact on how you live your life, you might be experiencing a mental health problem.

Around one in five women will experience a mental health problem during pregnancy or in the year after giving birth. This might be a new mental health problem or another episode of a mental health problem you've experienced before. These are known as perinatal mental health problems.

19Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a type of anxiety disorder which you may develop after being involved in, or witnessing, traumatic events. The condition was first recognised in war veterans and has been known by a variety of names, such as 'shell shock'. But it's not only diagnosed in soldiers – a wide range of traumatic experiences can cause PTSD.

20Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD)

Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) is a very severe form of premenstrual syndrome (PMS), which can cause many emotional and physical symptoms every month during the week or two before you start your period. It is sometimes referred to as 'severe PMS'.

While many people who are able to have periods may experience some mild symptoms of PMS, if you have PMDD these symptoms are much worse and can have a serious impact on your life. Experiencing PMDD can make it difficult to work, socialise and have healthy relationships. In some cases, it can also lead to suicidal thoughts.

21Psychosis

Psychosis (also called a psychotic experience or psychotic episode) is when you perceive or interpret reality in a very different way from people around you. You might be said to 'lose touch' with reality.
The most common types of psychosis are

  • hallucinations<.li>
  • delusions
22Schizoaffective disorder

You may be given a diagnosis of schizoaffective disorder if you experience:

  • psychotic symptoms, similar to schizophrenia, and
  • mood symptoms of bipolar disorder, and
  • you have both types of symptoms at the same time or within two weeks of each other

The word schizoaffective has two parts:

  • ‘schizo–‘ refers to psychotic symptoms
  • ‘–affective’ refers to mood symptoms
23Schizophrenia

You could be diagnosed with schizophrenia if you experience some of the following symptoms:

  • a lack of interest in things
  • feeling disconnected from your feelings
  • difficulty concentrating
  • wanting to avoid people
  • hallucinations, such as hearing voices or seeing things others don't
  • delusions (which could include paranoid delusions) – strong beliefs that others don't share
  • disorganised thinking and speech
  • not wanting to look after yourself
24Seasonal affective disorder (SAD)

Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a form of depression that people experience at a particular time of year or during a particular season. It is a recognised mental health disorder.

Most of us are affected by the change in seasons – it is normal to feel more cheerful and energetic when the sun is shining and the days are longer, or to find that you eat more or sleep longer in winter.

However, if you experience SAD, the change in seasons will have a much greater effect on your mood and energy levels, and lead to symptoms of depression that may have a significant impact on your day-to-day life.

25Self-esteem

Our self-esteem is how we value and perceive ourselves. If you have low self-esteem you may feel:

  • like you hate or dislike yourself
  • worthless or not good enough
  • unable to make decisions or assert yourself
  • like no one likes you
  • you blame yourself for things that aren't your fault
  • guilt for spending time or money on yourself
  • unable to recognise your strengths
  • undeserving of happiness
  • low in confidence.
26Self-harm

Self-harm is when you hurt yourself as a way of dealing with very difficult feelings, painful memories or overwhelming situations and experiences. Some people have described self-harm as a way to:

  • express something that is hard to put into words
  • turn invisible thoughts or feelings into something visible
  • change emotional pain into physical pain
  • reduce overwhelming emotional feelings or thoughts
  • have a sense of being in control
  • escape traumatic memories
  • have something in life that they can rely on
  • punish yourself for your feelings and experiences
  • stop feeling numb, disconnected or dissociated (see dissociative disorders)
  • create a reason to physically care for themselves
  • express suicidal feelings and thoughts without taking their own life.
27Sleep problems

You may find a sleep problem can lead you to:

  • have negative thoughts, feel depressed or anxious – if you have little sleep you may feel less able to rationalise worries or irrational thoughts
  • feel lonely or isolated – if you feel tired you may not want to be sociable or see friends
  • experience psychotic episodes – if you have a psychotic disorder or bipolar disorder, a lack of sleep may trigger mania, psychosis or paranoia, or make existing symptoms worse
  • 28Sucidal Feelings

    Suicide is the act of intentionally taking your own life.

    Suicidal feelings can range from being preoccupied by abstract thoughts about ending your life, or feeling that people would be better off without you, to thinking about methods of suicide, or making clear plans to take your own life.

    If you are feeling suicidal, you might be scared or confused by these feelings.

    But you are not alone. Many people think about suicide at some point in their lifetime.

    29Tardive dyskinesia

    Tardive dyskinesia (TD) is a condition where your face and/or body make sudden, jerky or slow twisting movements which you can’t control. It can develop as a side effect of medication, most commonly antipsychotic drugs.

    • ‘Tardive’ means delayed or appearing late (because it usually only develops after you’ve been taking medication for at least a few months and sometimes years).
    • ‘Dyskinesia’ means abnormal or unusual movements.

    Remedies and activities


    MCPD (Mentoring, Counselling and Personal Development) Program

    Mentoring and counseling:

    Counseling is designed to support victims by providing them with emotional support. Counseling allows them to rebuild their confidence and self-esteem, and take control of their own lives, that they may have lost due to mismanagement of their problems. Our friendly mentors and counselors will help victims re-valuing their lives and this in-turn will result in the betterment of their family life.

    Supporting the victims of domestic abuse:

    Domestic abuse does not just include physical violence; it also includes verbal, financial, psychological and emotional abuse. Our team includes victims of domestic abuse and therefore we aim to provide awareness of domestic abuse in the local community. By conducting workshops we will try to find possible solutions to this growing problem in our society. We also aim to provide Legal advice to them.

    Laughter Club:

    The purpose of this club is to promote and spread happiness amongst the members of the charity. This is a mental exercise to avoid and release stress and push away anxieties of life.

    Physical Health & well-being

    “Mind and Body are connected. managing our physical health is closely tied up with looking after our mental health.”

    The World Health Organisation’s definition of health is ‘a state of complete physical, mental and social wellbeing and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity’, so when we talk about physical health there are many elements to consider.


    Regular exercise, a balanced diet, proper sleep, and cutting down smoking, alcohol, and drug use are vital to physical health and mental wellbeing.


    However we look for Wellness which refers to the state of being in optimal mental and physical health. It's about living a life full of personal responsibility and therefore taking proactive steps for one's entire well-being.

    Types of Physical Activities

    Physical Exercise like aerobic and swimming
    Sports like Marshal Arts, Boxing and Karate
    Therapies like Yoga and Laughter
    Marathons and Hiking